Mathematics




"If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is."
- John von Neumann


Intermediate Algebra


Intermediate algebra, sometimes known as algebra II, primarily focuses on functions. Typically taught at the highschool level, the topics covered here are a precursor to college algebra and precalculus. Building on fundamentals, intermediate algebra introduces the concepts required by a multitude of disciplines down the proverbial road.

Prerequisites: Elementary Algebra






Precalculus / College Algebra


Precalculus, while not technically a mathematical subject in of itself, covers a set of topics which lays the foundation for the study of calculus. Precalculus includes most of the material covered by college algebra, but goes further to include trigonometry as well as an early introduction to limits and derivatives.

Apart from excluding any trigonometry, college algebra typically places a greater emphasis on the review of algebra topics.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra




Khan Academy
Algebra 2(Suggested before precalculus)


Linear Algebra


Linear algebra is the branch of mathematics concerned with the study of systems of linear equations. Topics include vector spaces, linear maps, determinants, and linear transformations. Linear algebra is central to both pure and applied areas of mathematics, and is applicable to a wide array of disciplines.






Single Variable Calculus


Calculus is the branch of mathematics concerned with the study of instantaneous rates of change (differential calculus) and the summation of infinitely small quantities (integral calculus). Single variable calculus introduces derivatives and integrals. Specifically, it covers the differentation and integration of functions of one variable.

Note: Titles such as Calculus I, Calculus II, and Calculus III, represent courses which comprise of topics that vary slightly depending on institution or country. Typically, however, single variable calculus consists of Calculus I and most of Calculus II.






Multivariable Calculus


Calculus is the branch of mathematics concerned with the study of instantaneous rates of change (differential calculus) and the summation of infinitely small quantities (integral calculus). Multivariable calculus, also known as multivariate calculus or vector calculus, addresses the differentiation and integration of functions of multiple variables, as opposed to single variable calculus.






Differential Equations


Differential equations define the relationship between functions and their derivatives. These equations play a significant role in describing the laws of nature, and are used in most fields of science to model and communicate complex, and usually physical, occurences.

Prerequisites: Multivariable Calculus